Greater Manchester Music Hub

Supporting your local music scene and attending local gigs is very important when trying to find more gigs for your band. Simply by making an effort to go to gigs and talking to the bands playing will enable you to make friends. In England, music services may be part of a Music Education Hub – groups of organisations working together to create joined-up music education provision. RCM Sparks has actively engaged as a consortium partner in the Tri-Music Together project, funded by Youth Music and led by the Tri-borough Music Hub. Summer 2018 marked the end of an initial two year project to enhance Early Years music provision from birth to age five in the Tri-borough area. Over the two years the programme engaged with 120 settings, 249 early years practitioners and 148 music leaders through a broad programme of training, peer-to-peer reflection, mini-projects and the development of resources.

There are lots of opportunities to start learning, and many are free or subsidised. Within the current phase ( ) the Tri-Music Together project continues to offer continuing professional development opportunities for Early Years educators and musicians both within and outside of the Tri-borough area. As a necessary part of the social restrictions in place to save lives during the pandemic, an unfortunate causality was the live music scene. Whatever genre you choose to listen to, classic or jazz; hip hop or punk; folk or metal; the electricity of a live gig just cannot be beat. Our lives were not quite the same without supporting our favourites in big arenas and local scene alike.

Regularly singing or playing an instrument is linked with improvements in your brain, especially memory and focus. Evidence from neuroscientists in Chile suggests that learning to play a musical instrument improves brain function, in particular attention and working https://www.artmindfestival.com/ memory. We broadcast online and on 106.3FM to the Barrow and Furness communities plus on 107.3 to Ulverston and surrounding area. We created the emerging talent development program Launchpad that now supports artists and emerging professionals throughout Yorkshire.

Dr Kadiatu Kanneh-Mason and her husband Stuart are not professional musicians themselves, but have raised seven children who are all studying and performing music to a very high level, including 2016 BBC Young Musician of the Year winner, Sheku. In her keynote at the 2020 Music Mark Annual Conference, Dr Kanneh-Mason emphasised that supporting musical progression as a parent is not about being a ‘superhero’ but nurturing the potential in every child. We work with local government and organisations to support, develop, promote and represent local music groups. Hubs are coordinated by the Hub lead organisation, which takes on responsibility for the funding and governance of the Hub. Each Hub lead organisation will receive a proportion of the overall funding amount based on their share of the overall number of eligible pupils in their local authority area. 90% of the funding is distributed based on each local authority’s share of the total number of pupils registered on roll and the remaining 10% is distributed based on their share of the numbers of pupils eligible for Free School Meals .

As well as delivering our services through schools we have a number of Music Centres throughout Northern Ireland to provide expert help and tuition. When putting yourself forward for gigs, use statistics to let pubs and venues know how live music can help generate revenue. You should also try and strike up a conversation with the promoter and the sound man as they will be at the heart of your music scene and therefore great people to network and be friends with. The survey of 175 musicians and music makers returned worrying statistics such as £1.75 million worth of financial loss due to cancelled or postponed live shows and 44% of respondents being unaware of any fiscal support available to musicians.

Show an interest, encourage your child, and create time and space for learning.

We invest public money from Government and The National Lottery to help support the sector and to deliver this vision. The station is seeking to boost awareness of local artists who are going through a tough time because of lockdown and not being able to play live. The station has played local tracks at least once an hour for a number of years but now they want to dedicate a day to music from Island bands, singers, songwriters and record producers. By following up and coming bands and being friends with promoters and venues, music fans and musicians will be kept abreast of upcoming local music news and gig updates and can share these updates through social media.

The latest information directly from the Island’s locally owned newspaper. Find more information about the Music Service and what we can offer via our network of music centres. Tell your fans, friends and family about other gigs going on in your local area.

The aim of the project is to develop the music skills of a team of Early Years practitioners ‘Music Champions’ in order to enrich music in their nursery settings for children aged 0-4, with a long-term aim to improve practice across the organisation. Convofollows the success ofSeven Seeds, a large scale performance of https://www.wikipedia.org/ a newly commissioned vocal work involving 160 schools, more than 20 Royal College of Music students from and 150 music co-ordinators. In November 2015 Seven Seedswas awarded the prize for ‘New Music’ by the Music Education Council of Great Britiain and shortlisted for the ‘Best Classical Music Education Initiative’.

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